While they have quiet for a number of weeks, the Los Angeles Kings have made a lot of noise in the past few days – and today was no exception as they have officially re-signed captain Dustin Brown to a long-term deal to further keep the team’s core intact.

Some may argue that the length of Brown’s new contract is a problem as eight years is considered too long of a deal. I disagree.

While I do admit that the 28-year-old has had consistency issues on the ice over the last few seasons, no one can argue just how much he means to the Los Angeles Kings – and that was proven in 2012 when he was an integral part of his team’s Stanley Cup victory that June.

Speaking of 2012, there were plenty of rumours going around suggesting that Dustin Brown was on his way out of the City of Angels. In fact, as the 2011-12 trade deadline closer approached, the more intense the trade rumours became.

But on the evening of February 25, less than 48 hours before the deadline, the Los Angeles Kings hosted a Chicago Blackhawks team they had a great deal of difficulty playing against in recent matchups. Despite that, the offensively-inept Kings took it to the Hawks and none other than Dustin Brown led the way scoring a hat-trick (the first of any Kings player that season) en route to a 4-0 win. With the addition of Jeff Carter from Columbus just two days earlier, the Los Angeles Kings were a force to be reckoned with on paper – but Brown’s sudden emergence made the silver-and-black a force on the ice, leading them to one of the most successful playoff runs in NHL history going 20-4 while becoming the first-ever eighth-seed to win the Stanley Cup.

For those of you who follow me regularly, you’d call me a liar if I say that I’ve never been critical of Dustin Brown – and you’d be correct. There were plenty of times when I didn’t think Brownie was playing up to his potential. Heck, I even suggested that he may not be captain material. Conversely, the Ithaca, New York native has certainly proved me wrong on more than one occasion. If Dustin Brown wasn’t scoring or setting up goals, he let his physical game do the talking – and few in Los Angeles are inclined to complain about that aspect of his game. After all, let’s face it, if Brown’s iconic hit on Vancouver’s Henrik Sedin was measured solely by views from Kings’ fans on YouTube, the hits would safely land among seven or even eight figures.

As great as the game against the Blackhawks was on February 25, though, his greatest output in my mind came on a date Kings’ fans will forever remember: June 11, 2012.

After being an impact player for the first three rounds of the playoffs, Dustin Brown was quiet in the Stanley Cup Final against New Jersey. After jumping out to a 3-0 series, the Kings lost the next two games and suddenly the Devils had the momentum.

But like his play three-and-a-half months prior, Dustin Brown stepped it up when it counted most scoring the first goal and setting up the second goal of Game 6 in Los Angeles en route to a decisive 6-1 victory that clinched the franchise’s first championship in their 45-year existence.

Simply put, it’s not what Brown can do on a regular basis but how he responds to criticism and his ability to step it up when it matters most that has the captain standing above the fray.

He may not have been as productive as he could have been this past spring but few Kings were and quite frankly, for everything Dustin Brown has done for the Los Angeles Kings, such a transgression can be overlooked as far as I’m concerned.

But for what he’s done on the ice, Dustin Brown’s impact off the ice has proven just as valuable. His tireless charity work has made the Olympic silver-medallist a humanitarian Kings fans are proud to call one of their own – and that’s not even mentioning what a likeable man Brown is in general.

Is eight years too long for Dustin Brown? I say no. His annual salary of just under $6 million makes the length of his new deal easier to digest and personally, locking up the captain for that long is time (and money) well-spent.

While I do look forward to eight more years of Number 23 donning the silver-and-black, I am most eager about this coming season and seeing what Los Angeles Kings and arguably their greatest captain have in store.

While they’ve quiet for a number of weeks, the Los Angeles Kings have made a lot of noise in the past few days – and today was no exception as they have officially re-signed captain Dustin Brown to a long-term deal to further keep the team’s core intact.

Some may argue that the length of Brown’s new contract is a problem as eight years is considered too long of a deal. I disagree.

While I do admit that the 28-year-old has had consistency issues on the ice over the last few seasons, no one can argue just how much he means to the Los Angeles Kings – and that was proven in 2012 when he was an integral part of his team’s Stanley Cup victory that June.

Speaking of 2012, there were plenty of rumours going around suggesting that Dustin Brown was on his way out of the City of Angels. In fact, as the 2011-12 trade deadline closer approached, the more intense the trade rumours became.

But on the evening of February 25, less than 48 hours before the deadline, the Los Angeles Kings hosted a Chicago Blackhawks team they had a great deal of difficulty playing against in recent matchups. Despite that, the offensively-inept Kings took it to the Hawks and none other than Dustin Brown led the way scoring a hat-trick (the first of any Kings player that season) en route to a 4-0 win. With the addition of Jeff Carter from Columbus just two days earlier, the Los Angeles Kings were a force to be reckoned with on paper – but Brown’s sudden emergence made the silver-and-black a force on the ice, leading them to one of the most successful playoff runs in NHL history going 20-4 while becoming the first-ever eighth-seed to win the Stanley Cup.

For those of you who follow me regularly, you’d call me a liar if I say that I’ve never been critical of Dustin Brown – and you’d be correct. There were plenty of times when I didn’t think Brownie was playing up to his potential. Heck, I even suggested that he may not be captain material. Conversely, the Ithaca, New York native has certainly proved me wrong on more than one occasion. If Dustin Brown wasn’t scoring or setting up goals, he let his physical game do the talking – and few in Los Angeles are inclined to complain about that aspect of his game. After all, let’s face it, if Brown’s iconic hit on Vancouver’s Henrik Sedin was measured solely by views from Kings’ fans on YouTube, the hits would safely land among seven or even eight figures.

As great as the game against the Blackhawks was on February 25, though, his greatest output in my mind came on a date Kings’ fans will forever remember: June 11, 2012.

After being an impact player for the first three rounds of the playoffs, Dustin Brown was quiet in the Stanley Cup Final against New Jersey. After jumping out to a 3-0 series, the Kings lost the next two games and suddenly the Devils had the momentum.

But like his play three-and-a-half months prior, Dustin Brown stepped it up when it counted most scoring the first goal and setting up the second goal of Game 6 in Los Angeles en route to a decisive 6-1 victory that clinched the franchise’s first championship in their 45-year existence.

Simply put, it’s not what Brown can do on a regular basis but how he responds to criticism and his ability to step it up when it matters most that has the captain standing above the fray.

He may not have been as productive as he could have been this past spring but few Kings were and quite frankly, for everything Dustin Brown has done for the Los Angeles Kings, such a transgression can be overlooked as far as I’m concerned.

But for what he’s done on the ice, Dustin Brown’s impact off the ice has proven just as valuable. His tireless charity work has made the Olympic silver-medallist a humanitarian Kings fans are proud to call one of their own – and that’s not even mentioning what a likeable man Brown is in general.

Is eight years too long for Dustin Brown? I say no. His annual salary of just under $6 million makes the length of his new deal easier to digest and personally, locking up the captain for that long is time (and money) well-spent.

While I do look forward to eight more years of Number 23 donning the silver-and-black, I am most eager about this coming season and seeing what Los Angeles Kings and arguably their greatest captain have in store.